Business

Economic statecraft is a central pillar of U.S. foreign policy. Business development is a key strategy toward furthering our economic interests.

Secretary Hillary Clinton’s said it best at speech to the Economic Club of New York in 2011.

“Our foreign and economic relations remain indivisible.  Only now, our great challenge is not deterring any single military foe, but advancing our global leadership at a time when power is more often measured and exercised in economic terms.”

The Political and Economic section provides assistance to American Businesses interested in working in Djibouti. Our Economic and Commercial Officer, assisted by a local Economic and Commercial Specialist, responds to business inquiries and shares information on Djibouti’s business climate. The Embassy does not have a dedicate U.S. Department of Commerce presence.

What is Africa First?

The Africa First legislation gives the U.S. Department of Defense expanded procurement authorities through the continent of Africa and the region, including preferences for qualifying local companies.  U.S. Congress first enacted such preferences in the Djibouti First legislation in January 2015.  On September 18, 2017, Congress repealed and replaced the Djibouti First program with the Africa First legislation.

What is the difference between Djibouti First and Africa First?

Under Africa First, Djiboutian firms have increased business opportunities.  Below is a high-level summary of the differences and similarities:

 

Djibouti First

Africa First

Competition limited to goods and services of the host nation (Djibouti)

Yes

Yes

Preference given to products and services of the host nation (Djibouti)

Yes

Yes

Preference given to “covered African countries” for contract opportunities across the African content and the region

No

Yes

Applies to opportunities in Djibouti

Yes

Yes

Applies to opportunities in countries other than Djibouti

No

Yes

Expiration Date

Yes

No

 

I was a Djibouti First company.  Am I automatically enrolled in Africa First?

No, a company that was a Djibouti First-eligible company does not automatically become an Africa First-eligible company.  Companies that wish to be part of the Africa First program and receive preferential bidding throughout the AFRICOM area of responsibility must re-apply for Africa First.  In order to qualify, a company must be registered locally, in good legal standing, and have a majority Djiboutian workforce or source/produce the majority of their products in Djibouti may qualify under this program.

Note that any Africa First company who has been found by the Contracting Officer or the U.S. Embassy to be guilty of malfeasance will be banned from the program.

How do I apply for Africa First?

·         Step 1: Complete the Africa First registration form (DOC 905 KB).

·         Step 2: Send the completed form to AfricaFirst_Djibouti@state.gov.

·         Step 3: After submitting the completed form, you will receive a notification of your acceptance into the program within 72 hours.

·         Step 4: Register for a DUNS number, an NCAGE Code, and in the SAM system.  More information on how to register for each is described below.

How do find open opportunities?

Visit available and open bidding opportunities on the following websites:

·         www.fedBizOpps.gov

·         http://www.fbo.gov

·         https://euro.neco.navy.mil/

·         https://dj.usembassy.gov/embassy/djibouti/procurement-acquisitions/

Follow the instructions on each bidding opportunity carefully.

Do these apply to non-US organizations?

Yes, this requirement applies to all types of organizations including foreign, non-profit, for-profit as well as for state and federal government agencies.

How do I get a DUNS number?

You need a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number in order to register your entity in SAM.  DUNS numbers are unique for each physical location.  If you do not have a DUNS number, you can request a DUNS number for free to do business with the U.S. Federal government by visiting Dun & Bradstreet (D&B) at: http://fedgov.dnb.com/webform

How do I register for NCAGE?

Foreign entities must obtain a NATO Commercial and Government Entity (NCAGE) code for each DUNS number before they plan to register in SAM.  For instructions on obtaining a NCAGE, visit:https://eportal.nspa.nato.int/AC135Public/scage/CageList.aspx

Make sure the name and address information you provide to get your NCAGE code is the same as what you used to get your DUNS number.  It takes up to three business days to obtain a NCAGE code.

How do I register in SAM?

Any government, business, grantee or organization (known as an “Entity” in SAM) wishing to do business with the federal government under a Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR)-based contract, or anyone applying for federal grants, cooperative agreements or other forms of federal financial assistance through Grants.gov, must be registered in SAM.  Here is the link: https://www.sam.gov/portal/SAM/##11.

I am registering an entity not located in the U.S. or its outlying areas.  How do I comply with the requirement to submit a letter formally appointing an Entity Administrator?

Step 1: Determine which template is required.

·         You need to formally appoint an Entity Administrator for a single international entity.  If you do not use a U.S. financial institution (see note) in SAM, use Template 3.

·         You need to formally appoint an Entity Administrator for a single international entity.  If you do use a U.S. financial institution (see note) in SAM, use Template 1.

NOTE: International entities registering in SAM are not required to enter banking information for Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) on the Financial Information page of the entity registration.  Those fields are optional.  An international entity may enter banking information for EFT if they use a U.S. financial institution.

Step 2: Complete the template and print on your entity’s letterhead.

·         If you do not have letterhead, enter your entity’s legal business name and physical address at the top of the letter before printing.

If using Template 1, proceed as follows:

Step 3: Sign the completed letter in the presence of the notary.

·         Make sure the person who signs the letter is someone with signatory authority, i.e. someone who can make commitments on behalf of the entity like the president, CEO, or other authorized representative.

·         Confirm your identity in accordance with your local notary procedures.

Step 4: Scan the completed, signed letter.

·         Submit a copy to the Federal Service Desk by creating a service ticket and attaching the scanned letter.

·         Your registration can be conditionally activated if you have an approved, scanned copy of the letter on file.

Step 5: Mail the completed, signed, notarized letter to the Federal Service Desk

It must be received at the address below within 45 days of activation or your registration will be expired.

FEDERAL SERVICE DESK

ATTN: SAM.GOV REGISTRATION PROCESSING

460 INDUSTRIAL BLVD

LONDON, KY 40741-7285

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

If using Template 3, proceed as follows:

Step 3: Sign the completed letter

·         Make sure the person who signs the letter is someone with signatory authority, i.e. someone who can make commitments on behalf of the entity like the president, CEO, or other authorized representative.

 Step 4: Scan the completed, signed letter.

·         Submit a copy to the Federal Service Desk by creating a service ticket and attaching the scanned letter.

·         Your registration can be conditionally activated if you have an approved, scanned copy of the letter on file.

Step 5: Mail the completed, signed letter to the Federal Service Desk.

·         It must be received at the address below within 45 days of activation or your registration will be expired.

 FEDERAL SERVICE DESK

ATTN: SAM.GOV REGISTRATION PROCESSING

460 INDUSTRIAL BLVD

LONDON, KY 40741-7285

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Doing Business in the U.S.